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Things every smart consumer should know about the food industry

Naturally produced small chain products, the yellow brick road to better health and better lives.

In the food industry more often than not less is more[1], naturally made goods produced in small batches bring good health to your table while mass-produced industry made products take away from that and don’t provide you with value for your money.

Industries buy raw materials in bulk from cultivators. This doesn’t necessarily involve quality checks, the produce is often ridden with fertilizers and pesticides which are used to maximise the yield which is then bought ideally at cheap prices, this depresses the farming class. Industries use preservatives and additive chemicals to increase the shelf-life of their products. Heavy machinery which uses heat is used, this takes away from the nutritional content of the product. Highly processed goods often mean more profits but processing makes food unhealthier than before. Big industries often outsource their activities which incorporates a number of middlemen into the production process, this adds to the chances of food fraud or adulteration. During this entire process, a lot of waste and pollution is produced.

However at Anveshan goods are produced in small batches[2] which enables us to work at the grassroots with the farmers and eliminate the middlemen, this enables the farmers to incorporate the latest technology to advance their economic lives and at the same time it enables us to bring a certain quality which would’ve suffered otherwise. The goods are produced using traditional methods which ensure no loss of nutritional content. Demand and production work as parallels at Anveshan which minimises pollution and waste and the products are delivered to your doorstep without any added chemicals and preservatives, we make sure that you get your money’s worth and you know what? It just tastes better!

References:

[1]https://www.forbes.com/sites/ryancaldbeck/2014/05/08/in-food-small-is-big/#3e9b8ef075fa

[2]http://www.the-kitchen-coop.com/the-economies-of-small-batch-production-lesson-on-lean-manufacturing/

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